Month: August 2016

New Hope for Dogs and Humans Who Suffer Blindness as a Result of LCA

Both dogs and humans suffer from blindness caused by  Leber congenital amaurosis, or LCA. Researchers have recently discovered that the disease is has similar causes in both humans and dogs.

According to Dr. Gustavo D. Aguirre of Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine, this information opens the door to developing therapies to halt or cure this form of blindness. The Penn team made an important discovery, although the dogs lack functional vision in daylight, the cone cells are still there even though they are very compromised.

The hope is that they can develop a therapy to stop the degenerative process and possibly reverse it. According to Dr. Aguirre they already have had success with preliminary gene therapy that indicates that this would be possible.

To read more:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160829140432.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fplants_animals%2Fdogs+%28Dogs+News+–+ScienceDaily%29

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Canine Hereditary Disorders Affect More Dogs Than Previously Thought

Good breeders typically do all of the genetic testing on the parents of a litter before they breed. Research has indicated that this is much more important than ever before.

Genoscoper Ltd. (a Finnish company specializing in animal genetics and gene testing) has published the most conclusive study ever on canine hereditary disorders. The study was done with researchers from the University of Helsinki and the University of Pennsylvania and published on PLOS ONE, 8/15/16.

They tested 7000 dogs in about 230 different breeds for a predisposition for about 100 genetic disorders. They found that 1 in 6 dogs carried at least one disease. Additionally, 1 in 6 breeds that never tested positive for one of the diseases had a predisposition for it.

This information will help dog owners understand and identify early signs of inherited disorders which may enable pet owners and veterinarians to better able  identify health issues earlier and perhaps prevent suffering for the dog.

This important study will lead to further research about inherited diseases in dogs that will help the overall health and well-being of both dogs and other pets.

www.sciencedalily.com/releases/2016/08/160822100703.htm

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Mighty Little Man

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Mighty Little Man: My Story, His Story, Our Story by Jonathon Scott Payne, ISBN: 1493634046, ISBN 13: 9781493634040; 328 pgs; self-published.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Mr. Payne’s writing style was direct, personal, honest and easy to read. The quality of the book itself is good and I did not find any grammatical or other mistakes.

Mr. Payne’s story is one of accomplishment and devotion. Although he had some difficult times, he did not dramatize the events in his life but yet told them in a way that made you relate or understand what he was going through.

His love of cats shines through the story and the way he wove Little Man into his story was an art form. The reader feels what Mr. Payne felt and got to know Little Man as if he were your own cat.

I personally can relate to Little Man since many of this antics and mannerisms were the same as my own cats. It made me feel good to recall them.

What impressed me was how much time, effort and I can imagine, money Mr. Payne spent to save Little Man’s life when he was afflicted with an unknown toxin that almost killed him. I applaud Mr. Payne and his family for standing with Little Man to save him.

Fortunately, Little Man survived but today it is still a mystery as to what caused his affliction.

I highly recommend this book for any pet lover. It is a heartwarming story about a man and a cat who would not give up.

I also applaud Mr. Payne for starting a petition to improve pet food. As a certified animal behavior consultant I have seen firsthand what bad food can do to an animal.

https://www.facebook.com/mightylittleman2014/

https://www.mightylittleman.com/

https://www.change.org/p/united-states-congress-our-pets-are-dying-from-illegal-pet-food-ingredients-we-need-little-man-s-law

Now you can clone your beloved pet

No matter if it is a dog, cat or other animal, or how many pets you have had in your life there is always that one special pet. Many people try to get another pet just like the one that they had. They go to the same breeder or try to pick one that has the same characteristics as the beloved pet. But it rarely ever works out because each animal is unique.

Cloning now lets a pet owner get the exact same animal. A company called ViaGen Pets has cloned the first puppy and kitten in the U.S. They are the only company that is in full compliance with all of the U.S. regulations and pet care practices.

Cloning is best done while the pet you wish to clone is alive because a small tissue sample is harvested, processed and stored. Then when you are ready, the DNA from your pet is implanted in a donor and will develop to full gestation.

The resulting pet will look and behave the same as the original pet. It will also have the same health issues which can be an advantage since in some cases,  the pet owner can take preventative measures.

If cloning had been available many years ago, I would have cloned my beloved SAR dog Scout.

For more information, contact: www.viagenpets.com or speak with a ViaGen counselor at 888-876-6104.
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